Category Archives: language policies

Get them in line: language policy, language tests and language teaching

The journalist and scholar H.L. Mencken (1880-1956) once observed that “For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple, and wrong.” One would think that academic literacy, the ability to use academic language competently, would be the first and only language concern of the academic communities that make up the university. Such is the complexity of language problems, however, that not all solutions for them will have to do with making education and study more effective. Student communities may, for example, make language demands that are primarily politically inspired, and have little bearing on scholarship. When decision-makers yield to the politically expedient solution, that solution may be rationalized in many ways that might have the pretence of having to do with education, but that actually has no theoretical justification. There are at least two recent cases in South Africa where the language policies of universities were changed for reasons other than academic ones, with negative consequences that were foreseen, but ignored.

Simple but wasteful

So, solutions to language problems at university can be arrived at simply: through what is most expedient politically, or most conventionally appealing, or perhaps least costly. Those simple and apparently less costly solutions can, however, in the long run come to have substantial waste (and therefore cost) associated with them. Continue reading

Academic literacy assessment: its role in times of change

changeWhat influence does the institutional, social or political landscape have on the way in which we test a person’s ability to handle academic language?  And how should one go about it? What impact should the tests have on language planning, instruction, and development?

These and other challenges will be thoroughly discussed by a team of experts on July 4, at the 40th Language Testing Research Colloquium (LTRC 2018).

Read more about the symposium entitled: Transformation and transition: four perspectives from the south on academic literacy assessment in times of change.

We look forward to sharing the papers with you, either at the Conference, or later on this website.

Top 14 design principles of language interventions

checklist.jpgResponsible design of language plans, courses or tests starts with the employment of one’s technical imagination, while allowing the design to be guided by the following principles: Continue reading

How to evaluate language interventions: the golden pentagon

golden-pentagonThe evaluation of language programme and instruction quality is highly relevant, everywhere. To test the effectiveness of a language intervention programme, one needs to take a holistic approach. For a language intervention to be effective, the designer has to bring into harmony five components: policy prescription, curriculum, instruction, learning and assessment When these are aligned, we have the golden pentagon of language intervention design. Where to begin? Continue reading